Part# 1055201 – Disc Brake Upgrade Kit

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Rotor Specs:

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NOTES:

  • Disc brakes should only be installed by someone experienced and competent in the installation and maintenance of disc brakes.

  • If you are not sure of how to safely use this brake component or kit, you should not install or use it.

  • Do not assume anything. Improperly installed or maintained brakes are dangerous. If you are not sure, get help or return the product.
  • This kit can be operated using the stock OEM master cylinder. However, to retain a more firm brake pedal feel many users swap to larger bore master cylinders such as the 1” bore variant found in 89-95 4-runners and V6 trucks. It is also optional to add an adjustable proportioning valve such as Wilwood 260-10922 to the rear circuit. As with most suspension and tire modifications (from OEM specifications), changing the brakes may alter the front to rear brake bias. Your specific needs will depend on other modifications to the system.

  • Buyers can elect to retain or disable the factory Load Sensing Proportioning Valve.

  • This kit fits most 15 inch diameter wheels and larger. If the caliper contacts the inside of a 15” wheel, in most cases it will be in limited “hot spots.” It is acceptable to sand the caliper casting to create clearance in these spots so long as no more than 1/8 inch of material is removed. At the time of installation, prior to any modification, get an estimate of clearance to the wheel. If it cannot be made to work, the kit can be returned to LSMFG so long as it is in resalable condition. Shipping costs will not be included in the refund.

  • The included rotors measure .220” thickness. The rotors in this kit slip on over the outside of the hub. This will move the wheel out .220” If longer stud lengths are needed with your particular wheels, then Dorman PN 610-261 can be used.

  • Replacement Parts:any component in the kit is normally in stock and ready to ship from LSMFG. Refer to the Disc Brake Parts category to see most of these. If you’d like OEM fitment info on sourcing calipers, hoses, or pads from a parts store then that is available by emailing orders@littleshopmfg.com The rotors begin as an off-the-shelf part prior to being machined and zinc plated by LSMFG. This work could be copied by a competent machine shop, although it would not likely be as inexpensive as buying them as part of the kit.

  • It is the responsibility of the buyer and installer of this kit to verify suitability/fitment of all components and ensure all fasteners and hardware achieve complete and proper engagement. Improper or inadequate engagement can lead to component failure.

  • It is the responsibility of the buyer and installer of this kit to verify suitability/fitment of all components and ensure all fasteners and hardware achieve complete and proper engagement. Improper or inadequate engagement can lead to component failure.

Installation:

1. For instruction purposes, the spindle was removed from the vehicle. It is not necessary to remove for the installation of the new brakes. This installation refers to the driver side. All steps are to be repeated on the passenger side in kind.Start by removing the caliper and brake line from the spindle.

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2. Using a flat head screw driver, remove the dust cap.

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3. The cotter pin can then be removed allowing the hub to be removed from the spindle. Do not discard the bearings and hardware, they will be reused.
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4. Remove the 5 bolts securing the rotor to the hub.

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5. The rotor can now be removed and discarded.

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6. Remove the cotter pins and castle nuts attaching the dust cover to the spindle. The dust cover can be removed and discarded.

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7. Reinstall the castle nuts and cotter pins with the new supplied washers to make up for the thickness of the dust cover.

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8. Reinstall the hub in the same way it was removed using the supplied cotter pin.


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9. You can now bolt on the caliper brackets using the included hardware. The caliper should be mounted to the back of the spindle. Make sure the spacer side is to the INSIDE and the notch for the caliper casting is UP.

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10. Note that the rotor slips over the outside of the hub. If longer stud lengths are needed with your particular wheels, then Dorman PN 610-261 can be used. The rotor can now be installed using 2 lug nuts to temporarily secure it. In the case of using drilled/slotted, note the direction shown is for the driver side.

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11. Before installing the caliper, check to confirm the machined pad spacers are present as well as make sure the notch lines up with the corresponding boss on the brake pad.


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12. The calipers can now be installed using medium strength threadlocker (such as Loctite 243) on the threads of the two 7/16-20 caliper bolts.

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13. Then install the hose onto the caliper as shown. Be sure to install the crush washers on top and bottom of the banjo fitting.

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Additional Information and Recommendations:

  • To properly bleed the brake system, begin with the caliper farthest from the master cylinder. Repeat the procedure until all calipers in the system are bled, ending with the caliper closest to the master cylinder. Note: When using a new master cylinder, it is important to bench bleed the master cylinder first.

  • Test the brake pedal. It should be firm, not spongy, and stop at least 1 inch from the floor under heavy load. If the brake pedal is spongy, bleed the system again. If the brake pedal is initially firm, but then sinks to the floor, check the system for leaks. Correct the leaks (if applicable) and then bleed the system again. If the brake pedal goes to the floor and continued bleeding of the system does not correct the problem, either air may be trapped in the system, or a master cylinder with increased capacity (larger bore diameter) may be required.

  • As with most suspension and tire modifications (from OEM specifications), changing the brakes may alter the front to rear brake bias. Rear brakes should not lock up before the front. Brake system evaluation and tests should be performed by persons experienced in the installation and proper operation of brake systems. Evaluation and tests should be performed under controlled conditions. Start by making several stops from low speeds then gradually work up to higher speeds. Always utilize safety restraint systems while operating the vehicle.

Brake Testing:

  • Make sure pedal is firm: Hold firm pressure on pedal for several minutes, it should remain in position without sinking. If pedal sinks toward floor, check system for fluid leaks. DO NOT drive the vehicle if pedal does not stay firm or can be pushed to the floor with normal pressure.

  • At very low speed (2-5 mph) apply brakes hard several times while turning steering from full left to full right, repeat several times. Remove the wheels and check that components are not touching, rubbing, or leaking.

  • Carefully examine all brake components, brake lines, and fittings for leaks and interference. Make sure there is no interference with wheels or suspension components.

  • Drive vehicle at low speed (15-20 mph) making moderate and hard stops. Brakes should feel normal and positive. Again check for leaks and interference.

  • Always test vehicle in a safe place where there is no danger to (or from) other people or vehicles.

  • Always wear seat belts and make use of all safety equipment.

Pad and Rotor Bedding:

  • Once the brake system has been tested and determined safe to operate the vehicle, follow these steps for the bedding of the pads and rotors. These procedures should only be performed on a race track, or other safe location where you can safely and legally obtains speeds up to 65 MPH, while also being able to rapidly decelerate.

  • Begin with a series of light decelerations to gradually build some heat in the brakes. Use an on-and-off the pedal technique by applying the brakes for 3-5 seconds, and then allow them to fully release for a period roughly twice as long as the deceleration cycle. If you use a 5 count during the deceleration interval, use a 10 count during the release to allow the heat to sink into the pads and rotors.

  • After several cycles of light stops to begin warming the brakes, proceed with a series of medium to firm deceleration stops to continue raising the temperature level in the brakes.

  • Finish the bedding cycle with a series of 8-10 hard decelerations from 55-65 MPH down to 25 MPH while allowing a proportionate release and heat-sinking interval between each stop. The pads should now be providing positive and consistent response.

  • If any amount of brake fade is observed during the bed-in cycle, immediatelybegin the cool down cycle. • Drive at a moderate cruising speed, with the least amount of brake contact possible, until most of the heat has dissipated from the brakes. Avoid sitting stopped with the brake pedal depressed to hold the car in place during this time. Park the vehicle and allow the brakes to cool to ambient air temperature.

Post-Bedding Inspection:

After the bedding cycle, the rotors should exhibit a uniformly burnished finish across the entire contact face. Any surface irregularities that appear as smearing or splotching on the rotor faces can be an indication that the brakes were brought up to temperature too quickly during the bedding cycle. If the smear doesn’t blend away after the next run-in cycle, or if chatter under braking results, sanding or resurfacing the rotors will be required to restore a uniform surface for pad contact.

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